ARCHIVE: Research / Grants / Consultancies

2006-2007

Victorian Department of Justice
Predictors of relapse in problem gambling.

With significant prevalence rates of problem gambling in Australia and other countries relapse following treatment is a major concern. Research into relapse processes in problem gambling has only recently emerged as a field of inquiry. Funded by the Victorian Department of Justice this project will investigate key processes of relapse. Benefits from identifying predictors of relapse include early intervention strategies to improve longer term treatment outcomes.

The methodology for the investigation of relapse includes focus groups with consumers, clinicians, and other service providers. Also a Delphi group will be conducted with national and international experts to develop a definition of relapse. Following the qualitative inquiries a 12 month observational study will be implemented with approximately 100 to 150 problem gamblers receiving treatment from agencies throughout South Australia.

Funds provided by Victorian Department of Justice - $240,509.

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Department of Health & Ageing
Audit of Australian medical Schools:  Assessing Curriculum Content in Chronic Condition Self-Management, (CDAMS).

The continuing development and understanding of improved models of care for chronic conditions has implication for the curriculum currently taught in medical schools. There is a need for medical students to have an appreciation of the framework for health care. The cost, population and organizational imperatives require that there is a change of medical school curriculum focus away from acute illness to that of chronic morbidity.

The Unit has been funded to undertake a national audit of existing chronic condition self-management content, educational methodology and resources / material already in use in medical schools, and to provide a report to the Department of Health & Ageing and the Office of Deans of Australian Medical Schools. It is expected that the report will clarify if and where any potential gaps in chronic condition self-management education are in Australian medical school curricula, and identify and share information on best practice in Chronic Condition Self-Management education.

Funds provided by Australian Government Departments of Health and Ageing for the period 2005-2006 - $87,156.

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Department of Health & Ageing
An analysis of training and information options to support chronic disease prevention and self-management in primary health care.

FHBHRU undertook an analysis of the training and information options to support chronic disease prevention and self-management in primary health care, including:

(a) An investigation of the knowledge and skills needed by primary health care and other relevant professionals to support patients to prevent chronic disease through healthier lifestyles and/or self-management of existing chronic conditions;

(b) An investigation of the current knowledge and skills base, perceptions, practice, enablers and barriers relating to chronic disease prevention and/or self-management of the above mentioned professionals;

(c) An investigation of what professional development opportunities are currently available to meet these needs;

(d) Identification of where the gaps are in the professional development opportunities currently available, and strategic analysis of those gaps to identify which are of highest priority; and

(e) Strategic analysis of options available to the Department to address the priority gaps and the pros and cons of each option.


The Final Report will draw together the outcomes of all stages of the Project, with detailed options to address the gaps in a way which could significantly enhance the knowledge, skills and capacity of primary health care professionals to support their patients to prevent chronic disease through healthier lifestyles and/or self manage any existing chronic conditions.

Project to be completed by January 2008.

Funds provided by: Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing - $463,017

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Department of Veteran Affairs
Veterans, Real Partners in Health, a self-management program for Vietnam Veterans with alcohol and PTSD disorders.

A Trial of Evidence-Based Care and Self-Management for Vietnam Veterans with Alcohol related disorders

Flinders University through the Flinders Human Behaviour & Health Research Unit, and the Repatriation General Hospital (RGH), health care professionals and Vietnam Veteran’s Counselling Service, is trying to understand if increasing a veteran’s capacity to self-manage, that is manage their own condition better, can make a difference to their health and lifestyle outcomes.  The study has been commissioned by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

Funds provided by Department of Veteran Affairs - $714,000

General information - DVA_taking_control_flyer.pdf (PDF 954KB)
Participant Information Sheet & Consent Form - DVA_participant_info.pdf (PDF 112KB)
Flinders ProgramTM in research: Vietnam Veterans (power-point presentation) - Flinders_Model_in_research_Vietnam_Veterans.ppt (PPT 652KB)

Recruitment closed 18/01/08.

For further information on the project, please contact Project staff on (08) 8404 2320.

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Southern Adelaide Health Service Incorporated
Chronic disease self management training Southern Adelaide Health Service

FHBHRU will provide training and support to Southern Adelaide Health Service (SAHS to assist in the progression of their Australian Better Health Initiative Chronic Disease Self-Management Support initiative.  The training and support will be offered to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders team in the first instance.

Training and evaluation will occur from August 2007 to August 2008.

Funds supplied by Southern Adelaide Health Service Incorporated - $49,458

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Department of Health & Ageing
The development of a framework to guide the integration of chronic disease self-management into undergraduate curricula.

The project identifies the issues that need to be addressed in the development of a framework to guide the integration of chronic disease self-management (CCSM) principles into undergraduate curricula and the plan for integration. This will result in a draft curriculum framework and suggested guide to integrate and embed CCSM training into undergraduate health curricula nationally. 

Funds provided by Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing - $314,416.

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Research 2000-2005

Department of Health & Ageing

The Unit was required to evaluate a project consisting of a number of components to support the development and implementation of chronic condition self-management (CCSM) education and training for a range of health providers. The Project focuses on general practitioners, allied health professionals, nurses and Aboriginal health workers, and involves the undergraduate, postgraduate and the Technical and Further Education (TAFE) sectors.
The specific components of the Project were:

  • Development of a national chronic condition self-management medical curriculum discussion paper for presentation at the Australian and New Zealand Association of Medical Educationists (ANZAME) Special Interest Meeting, and a briefing paper for presentation at the Committee of Deans, and a report to the Australian Government Department of Health & Ageing on the outcomes of both.
  • Further development of postgraduate courses and delivery through Flinders University of on-line chronic condition self-management courses.
  • Audit of key medical and health conferences, seminars and workshops to be held between September 2004 and June 2005 across Australia, with recommendations for opportunities for promoting CCSM.
  • Evaluate and report on the aggregated Flinders Human Behaviour & Health Research Unit CCSM training workshop data.
  • Mapping of all relevant TAFE, undergraduate and postgraduate national health courses.
  • Preparation of a scoping paper for embedding CCSM into health science curriculum.
  • Preparation of a consultation framework and scoping paper for embedding CCSM into Aboriginal Health Worker courses.
  • The development, piloting and evaluation of a CCSM medical curriculum leading to the preparation of a CCSM resource package for medical schools.

Total funding received for this project for the period June 2004 - January 2006 was $301,819.

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Department of Health & Ageing - National Health Priority Action Council

The FHBHRU was funded to undertake services relating to the self-management component of the national chronic disease strategy. The services were undertaken on behalf of the National Health Priority Action Council (NHPAC) through the Commonwealth.

The overall strategy was developed and drafted using information and advice provided from the Unit and a number of other individual contracts / projects focusing on the other agreed key action areas (prevention; early detection and early treatment; and integration and continuity of care) and key enabling factors (workforce capacity; strategic partnerships; investment and funding; and information technology and disease management systems) with the overall strategy being bought together by the drafter of the strategy.

The Unit was required to prepare a report that:

  1. synthesized existing material on chronic condition self-management (i.e. evidence, models of care, demonstration projects, pilots, jurisdictional and international examples and existing programs to improve self-management across the continuum of care);
  2. provided advice on the current "strategy-of-play" and innovative approaches, particularly in Australian concerning self-management of chronic disease, including practical approaches that could be adopted in the short and medium term; and
  3. provided the rationale and principles for effective self-management, including an agreed definition which clarifies the terminology about self-management for the purpose of the strategy.

The Unit was also required to consult with key stakeholders and incorporate feedback as advised by the NHPAC National Chronic Disease Strategy Working Group.

Total funding for the project over the period December 2004 and March 2005 was $69,597.

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Department of Health & Ageing

The COPER program currently provides a three week cognitive behavioural program for people referred by Workcover after failed traditional medical management of back pain. There is no formal follow up program of these patients to their usual general practitioner or managing specialist and often the gains made in the program are lost through lack of coordination of care and conflicting approaches offered to the patient.

The participants undertook the piloting of the COPER program enhanced with the Flinders Model of self-management support, in particular, intervention around chronic condition management. Participation also contributed to the overall objectives of the Sharing Health Care Initiative.

Funding provided was $13,770 for the period February - August, 2005.

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Department of Health & Ageing

The Department perceives that there is a need to develop new education and training programs which educate health professionals to better address the paradigm shift towards improved management of people with chronic conditions. Such education programs should aim to provide health professionals with the knowledge, attitudes and skills to provide efficient, cost effective and quality care for people with chronic conditions.

Incorporating this approach systematically into Australian health services will demand a comprehensive education strategy and the development of the Graduate Certificate of Health (self-management) as a part of the broader FHBHRU project to pilot the development of chronic condition self-management curriculum in medical education, is a step in this direction.
The Unit was funded to develop a fully on-line Graduate Certificate in Health (self-management) which will become fully self sufficient by February 2006.

The course aims to meet the extended professional development needs of graduates involved in the provision of policy, planning or delivery of services to people with chronic physical or mental health conditions. It seeks to offer students an extended understanding of the principles and skills involved in the development and implementation of self-management enhancing programs in diverse settings, including programs for health professionals and service consumers / patients.

Funding provided for the period February 2005 - February 2006 was $75,583.

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Department of Health & Ageing

The continuing development and understanding of improved models of care for chronic conditions has implication for the curriculum currently taught in medical schools. There is a need for medical students to have an appreciation of the framework for health care. The cost, population and organizational imperatives require that there is a change of medical school curriculum focus away from acute illness to that of chronic morbidity.

The Unit has been funded to undertake a national audit of existing chronic condition self-management content, educational methodology and resources / material already in use in medical schools, and to provide a report to the Department of Health & Ageing and the Office of Deans of Australian Medical Schools. It is expected that the report will clarify if and where any potential gaps in chronic condition self-management education are in Australian medical school curricula, and identify and share information on best practice in Chronic Condition Self-Management education.

Funding of $95,872 has been provided over the period 2005 - 2006.

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The Mental Health Peer Supported Hospital-to-Home Service Project

This 3-month pilot project is part of the Department of Health/Mental Health Unit’s Mental
Health Care Improvement Initiative (MHCII), recently developed and launched by the Director
of Mental Services South Australia, to improve mental health services in SA. The project uses the resources of Metropolitan Home Link, in conjunction with existing public mental health peer-based activities in the southern region of Adelaide (Population 364,100). Funding for this service is managed by Aged Care & Housing Group / ACCA (funding to be managed by Home Support Service (HSS) from October 2006), supporting people with their care to avoid a hospital admission or to leave hospital early. This hospital to community bridging aims to reduce frequency of re-admission, particularly for people whose social supports are diminished, who are at risk of leaving hospital with a week’s medication and not attending GP appointments, and those consumers who may be waiting for referrals to community mental health services to be actioned.

Final report 6 December 2006:

Mental Health Peer Supported Hospital-to-Home Project Report - Mental_Health_Peer_supported_hospital_to_home_report.pdf (PDF 277KB)

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Grants / Consultancies 2000-2005

Department of Health & Aged Care - Sharing Health Care Initiative

The Flinders Human Behaviour & Health Research Unit was funded over the period 2002 - 2004 by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing under the Sharing Health Care Initiative, to provide education and training programs nationally for the demonstration projects. More specifically the contract required the Flinders Human Behaviour & Heath Research Unit to provide:

  • Education: Module 6 (Chronic & Complex Conditions) postgraduate education (for all projects). This involved the marketing, delivery and evaluation of Module 6 (Chronic and Complex Diseases) to up to 63 participants (with a range of professional backgrounds) from the eight demonstration projects.
  • Training: The delivery of a range of training programs to general practitioners, allied health professionals, nurses, Aboriginal health workers and lay trainers participating in the Sharing Health Care Initiative projects, following an evaluation of the training needs of each site in the eight projects. Training was provided in 3-hour and 10-15 hour sessions to multi sites within seven of the eight demonstration projects. Feedback from these sessions was used to identify local trainers to undertake a train the trainer program, following which they have been accredited to deliver training to achieve sustainability.

Total funding for this project was $469,761 (+ GST).

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Health Promotion SA and the SA Department of Human Services - Statewide Self-Management Programs for people with chronic illnesses

The Programs aim to develop self management approaches within an outcomes-based system of care, that supports health promotion initiatives supporting continuous clinical improvement.
Outcomes from the programs are expected to be:

  • Implementation of tools and processes, training and education with non-government agencies, mainstream services and health professionals;
  • Development of systems of coordination and communication between patient, non-government agencies, GPs and hospitals by way of formulated self-management longitudinal care plans;
  • Establishment of projects that aim to achieve improved health outcomes for the same or less cost in terms of service utilisation, using self-management approaches;
  • Establishment of projects that will incorporate the use of information technology and service utilisation tracking systems to enable self-management approaches to be incorporated within an outcomes-based continuous improvement health system;
  • Evaluation of the effectiveness of the inclusion of health promotion strategies into the coordinated care trials.

Funding totaling $500,000 has been provided as follows:

(a) project management-$125,000. These funds are available to the Unit.

(b) Support for the Northern Venture second round coordinated care trial in South Australia-$25,000. This was eventually made available to the Unit to develop a strategic plan and quality assurance framework for the CCSM Training for the Department of Health, South Australia.

(c) Sub-projects, of which there are four-$350,000. These projects are:

  • Noarlunga Health Services-$100,000
  • An approach to improving the emotional and physical well-being of people who experience chronic mental health problems
    Repatriation General Hospital-$100,000
  • Informed partnerships for effective self-management of chronic and complex lung conditions
    Adelaide Western Division of General Practice $50,000
  • Cardiac rehabilitation-self-management project involving GPs, the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide Community Health Service and patients
  • Eyre Peninsula Division of General Practice-$100,000
    To develop, through participation of families and community members, a local model of CDSM for Aboriginal people with chronic conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular and respiratory disease and related problems living in Ceduna and Port Lincoln.

NSW Health Department - Developing a Draft NSW Chronic and Complex Care Personal Health Record (joint project with Ron van Konkelenberg, Malcolm Battersby, Olga Lukjanenko and Andrew McAlindon). Share of the funding $9,100.

James Cook University-Department of Health and Aged Care
Flinders University, through the Centre for Remote Health, has been subcontracted to deliver a number of postgraduate modules for the Postgraduate Public Health Education for Clinicians short course. The Unit has been engaged to delivery the chronic disease module, for which it will receive funding of $8,625.

North Metropolitan Population Health Unit, Joondalup, WA
Provision of chronic disease self management training-$7,939.

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Previous Grants

James Cook University-Department of Health & Aged Care

Postgraduate Public Health Education for Clinicians (PHEC)-The overall project was managed by James Cook University to whom funding was awarded. James Cook University engaged the Unit as a subcontractor to develop an accredited CDSM education module for GPs and then to adapt that module for allied health professionals, Aboriginal health workers and community bases lay trainers. The Unit was also required to develop accreditation guidelines to be used for accrediting CDSM consumer courses. The Flinders Human Behaviour & Health Research Unit's share of the original contract amount was $162,507 and this was supplemented by variations of $13,472 for a national mapping exercise and $10,529 to incorporate a chronic disease self management module. Total funding received by Unit for this project was $186,508.

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Department of Health & Aged Care

Support of $195,000 for the Southern Health Advancement Collaboration (principals Dr Malcolm Battersby, Dr Rene Pols and Dr Peter Frith) to prepare a submission for a second round coordinated care trial. The proposal comprised six major initiatives:

  • Reducing hospital admissions by focussing on clients suffering from specific chronic and complex conditions with comorbidities and previous hospital admission;
  • A residential care project comprising care planning with advance directives, falls prevention and the provision of acute medical care in nursing homes;
  • The use of flexible aged care packages cashed out at the high dependency level of residential care for clients fulfilling ACAT criteria, but with clients managed in the community rather than being placed in residential care;
  • A focus on opiate dependent patients to reduce morbidity, improve health outcomes and to reduce the impact on the client, their families and the community;
  • The progressive development of sustainable systems and processes to provide better integration, collaboration, complementary service provision in a more cost effective way;
  • The progressive development of an on line IT system aimed at integrating and coordinating clinical data, enhancing clinical communications on line in real time, supporting clinicians to carry out care plans and adhere to guidelines, as well as enabling the monitoring of service use and costs.

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Department of Health & Aged Care

Commencing in 2000 The Flinders Human Behaviour & Health Research Unit received funding of $77,000 originally for the period April-August to:

  • Provide information, education and development support to coordinated care trials in SA and nationally;
  • Develop and provide training manuals for service coordinators and general practitioners for assessment, care planning and coordination skills;
  • Pilot the use of a self-management model within the coordinated care model; and
  • Disseminate results of the coordinated care trial through the preparation of publications and presentations. This project was extended during the selection and negotiation stage for second round coordinated care trials and further funding was received as follows:
  • $160,450 for the period September 2000-June 2001 for the same purposes as above, but with the following addition-assist the trials in developing and further refining the training components of their proposed operations
  • $86,405 for the period July-December 2001

Total funding received for this project was $323,855.

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Department of Health and Aged Care

Funding of $20,166 for a project to identify and recommend assessment instruments for the second round coordinated care trials (late 2000/early 2001).

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Western Sydney Area Health Service

Funding of $20,746 to provide training in self-management for staff involved in;

  1. a project aiming to develop and evaluate arrangements for coordinating care for people with coronary artery disease and diabetes and,
  2. a project aiming to improve prevention, early identification, early intervention and ongoing care for Aboriginal people with or at risk of vascular disease.

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Federation Health, Moe Victoria

Funding of $6,275 for a project to review Federation Health's program and funding from the Department of Health and Aged Care and to assist in further developing the outcomes based model of care.

Should you require further information regarding the Flinders Human Behaviour & Health Research Unit's funding, please contact David Agnew.

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