Rapid Appraisal of Social Inclusion Initiative

Kate Biedrzycki

This Rapid Appraisal Case Study of South Australia’s Social Inclusion Initiative (SII) was undertaken to contribute to the work of the Social Exclusion Knowledge Network (SEKN) of the World Health Organization’s Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSSA Health). The CSSA Health was established in 2005 to investigate ways in which international, national, regional and local bodies could take action on the social determinants of health. The report provided a rapid assessment of the ways in which South Australia’s SII has originated and operated. The research was conducted between March and June 2007 with SEKN leadership and in collaboration with the Australian Health Inequities Program, Flinders University and staff from the Social Inclusion Unit, Department of Premier and Cabinet.

The CSSA Health’s nine themed Knowledge Networks synthesise knowledge around incorporating complex social dimensions and the social determinants of health into policy and programming across all government sectors. Part of SEKN’s work is to assemble country case studies to provide a systems level analysis of processes and factors that enable and/or constrain the implementation and scaling up of policies, programs and/or institutional arrangements that have the potential to reduce social exclusion and ultimately reduce health inequalities.

Evidence which informed the South Australian SII rapid appraisal included interview evidence from key informants and documentary evidence. Questions asked of the documents and interview respondents followed a standard template developed by the SEKN for the Case Study Appraisals. These were to provide background information, explanations of how the program/policy was developed, assessment of what factors aided its success, and the extent to which the action is assessed as transferable to other regions or countries.

The final report of the Rapid Appraisal Case Study of South Australia’s Social Inclusion Initiative was published in June 2007 and can be viewed at
http://som.flinders.edu.au/FUSA/PublicHealth/AHIP/Publications2007.htm